Technical University of Denmark

The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) conducts research and teaching in the areas of engineering and natural sciences, with a focus on sustainability. It is furthermore involved in industrial collaboration and public sector consultancy. DTU’s main campus is in Lyngby, with several other departments and research centres located across Denmark. It offers 35 Bachelor and 28 MSc programmes and 19 PhD schools. Over 10,000 students were enrolled in 2015, with a staff of around 5,800. Its expenses were DKK 4.8 billion (ca. €651 million) in 2015.

Three out of DTU’s Departments and Centres actively participates in ECRA. The Climate Change and Sustainable Development (CCSD) Research group at the Department of Management Engineering conducts transdisciplinary research focused on climate change impacts, risks, adaptation and mitigation, including integrated physical (climate), environmental and economic modelling focussing on the risks of high-impact events and extremes, decision-support and climate services. The group part extensively participates in national and international projects and co-leads the ECRA CP on High-Impact Events and Climate Change.  Furthermore, the Department collaborates with the United Nations Environment Programme on energy, climate and sustainable development (UNEP DTU Partnership).

The Department of Environmental Engineering is one of the largest university departments in Europe specialising in water, environmental engineering and sustainability. The department’s research broadly covers the atmospheric environment, hydrology and urban and terrestrial water systems; the group on urban water engineering holds a leading role within the area of extreme precipitation, statistical downscaling of climate information and climate adaptation planning. The National Space Institute (DTU Space) conducts climate and environmental research based on remote sensing techniques on the melting of the Greenland ice cap, sea ice, sea level and the atmospheric composition, among others.

Research in polar regions is carried out by the interdisciplinary Center for Polar Activities with a focus on climate change monitoring, sustainable exploitation of polar resources and social and technological development. Together with Danish Meteorological Institute and GEUS the centre runs the Polar Portal, an information website on ice and climate in the Arctic.

Collaborative Programmes

DTU is active in the following ECRA Collaborative Programmes:

  • Arctic Climate Stability and Change
  • High impact events and climate change
  • Changes in the hydrological cycle
  • Sea level change and coastal impacts

Projects

All of DTU’s publications and projects are accessible in the database DTU Orbit. For the specific sections/departments, the projects are listed below:

Infrastructure (selection)

Instrumentation for satellites
Data processing
Modelling capacities
Research vessel “Dana”

Contacts

Birte Holst Jørgensen
Member of ECRA Executive Committee
DTU Management Engineering: Systems Analysis
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Research Centre for Energy, Environment and  Technology of Spain
The Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT) is a public research institution assigned to the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness under the Secretariat of State for Research, Development and Innovation. In addition to its headquarters in Madrid it has five research centres across Spain. Its main focus lies on studying, developing and improving energy sources (renewable energies, nuclear fusion, nuclear fission, fossil fuels) and their impact on the environment, developing new technologies, and basic research such as high energy physics. It furthermore has a technology transfer programme. CIEMAT has a staff of 1,330 and an annual budget of €95 million (2015).

The Department of Environment is one of five technical departments. It is concerned with the environmental consequences of energy production, industry and transport and their mitigation, while promoting sustainable development. Hence, the main areas of work are air pollution, soil and environmental geology, climate change. The department has a staff of 121 people.

The activities of CIEMAT’s Climate Change Programme focus on the scientific basis (the role of aerosols), monitoring and surveillance (greenhouse gas fluxes in forest and agricultural systems; soils), impacts (on air pollution and ecosystems), public behaviour (sustainable consumption) and environmental technologies for mitigation (geological storage of CO2).

Collaborative Programmes

CIEMAT is active in the following ECRA Collaborative Programmes:

Changes in the Hydrological Cycle

Projects

For an overview of CIEMAT’s R&D&I projects in the area of climate change, please consult the programme’s website. International projects and collaborations are listed here.

Infrastructure

Headquarters + 5 specialised centres
Laboratories (incl. 7 environment labs)
Pre-industrial pilot facilities

Contacts

Begoña Artiñano
Member of ECRA’s Executive Committee
Head of Atmospheric Pollution Unit
Department of Environment
CIEMAT
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Thomas Schmid
Researcher
Department of Environment
CIEMAT
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Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute

The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) is an agency under the Ministry of the Environment and Energy, based in Norrköping. It is tasked with providing weather forecasts and warnings, professional services, research and development as well as observations and data analysis. The agency has approximately 600 employees and an annual budget of SEK 700 million (around €73.5 million) (2015).

SMHI conducts applied research in the fields of hydrology, oceanography, air quality, atmospheric remote sensing, meteorology, and climate.

Climate research is conducted at the Rossby Centre, SMHI’s climate modelling research unit. It studies the processes and the behaviour of the climate system and develops global and regional climate models.

In 2014, SMHI was selected as host institute for the International Project Office for CORDEX (IPOC), the Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment by the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). Furthermore, SMHI runs the Swedish National Knowledge Centre for Climate Change Adaptation whose role is to provide information for those involved or interested in climate change adaptation and bring together science, policy and practice.

Collaborative Programmes

SMHI is active in the following ECRA Collaborative Programmes:

  • Arctic Climate Stability and Change

  • High impact events and climate change

  • Changes in the hydrological cycle

  • Sea level change and coastal impacts

Projects

The Rossby Centre is a part of Swedish, EU and other international projects, such as three of the last projects to be funded under FP7 and the Horizon 2020 projects CRESCENDO (Coordinated research in Earth Systems and climate: experiments, knowledge, dissemination and outreach). A list of other national and international projects can be found here.

Infrastructure

Observation stations on land
Operational reception and processing of meteorological satellite data
Weather radar network
Hydrological measurement operation
Tide gauge stations and buoys
Ships
Supercomputer Linux cluster, operated by the National Supercomputer Centre (NSC)
at Linköping University

Contacts

Ralf Döscher
Rossby Centre Scientific Coordinator
SMHI, Rossby Centre
SE-601 76 Norrköping
Sweden

Met RGB Horisontal Engelsk

The Norwegian Meteorological Institute (MET Norway) is a state agency under the Ministry of Education and Research based in Oslo with offices in Bergen and Tromsø. It provides meteorological services for public and private sectors, operates meteorological and climatological observations over land, seas and in the Arctic, and conducts research and development. Its official data and products are freely available. The Institute has a staff of around 700 (2016) and an annual budget of around NOK 450 million (ca. €49 million) (2017).

The Research and Development department is concerned with model and climate analysis, ocean and ice, oceanography and marine meteorology as well as climate modelling and air pollution. An important part of the research is monitoring and forecasting sea ice and ocean conditions such as sea level as well as regional climate modelling for Norway, the surrounding ocean areas and the Arctic.

MET Norway in collaboration with other institutions in the field is operating the Norwegian Centre for Climate Services (NCCS) which provides climate and hydrological data as a basis for decision making on climate change adaptation.

MET Norway runs the Norwegian Ice Service and furthermore the website Yr.no together with the country’s broadcasting company NRK, which provides weather and climate information in Norway and the whole world.

Collaborative Programmes

MET Norway is active in the following ECRA Collaborative Programmes:

High Impact Events and Climate Change

Changes in the Hydrological Cycle.

Projects

A list of MET Norway’s projects and activities can be found at this site.

Infrastructure

Observation network for land, ocean, ice (esp. High North)
Satellites
Climate, ocean and ice modelling capabilities
Connection to a national supercomputer at NUST in Trondheim and the ECMWF facilities (http://www.ecmwf.int/)

Contact

Michael Schulz (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

 

Finnish Meteorological Institute

The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) is a research and service agency under the Ministry of Transport and Communications, with its main office in Helsinki. Its main objective is providing information in the form of weather data and forecasts and ensuring public safety in the face of hazards. Approximately 680 employees work at FMI at the moment. Its budget was €72.4 million in 2016.

Apart from FMI’s Weather and Safety division, its Research and Development division covers research in meteorology, air quality, climate change, earth observation, and marine and Arctic research areas.

FMI’s sub-division Climate research focuses on the three areas atmospheric and ocean modelling, carbon cycle modelling and remote sensing of aerosols and clouds. The objective of the Climate Service Centre is to conduct weather, climate and socio-economic research to support adaptation. The Atmospheric Composition research unit studies aerosols and trace gases affecting the climate and air quality. Atmospheric modelling and polar meteorology are among the four research topics of the Meteorology research group. The Marine Research Unit studies physical oceanography, sea ice, and sea level. The focus of the Earth Observation programme is satellite-based remote sensing. Finally, the Arctic Research division, including a research centre north of the Arctic Circle, focuses on polar ozone and Arctic snow coverage.

Collaborative Programmes

FMI is active in the following ECRA Collaborative Programmes:
Arctic Climate Stability and Change
High Impact Events and Climate Change

Projects

For the following research areas, overviews of projects are available at FMI’s website:

Infrastructure

Observation stations (>400)

Remote sensing (radars, satellites)

Arctic Research Centre (ARC) at Sodankylä

Atmospheric Research Centre of Eastern Finland

Finnish Marine Research Infrastructure (FINMARI)

Contacts

Ari Laaksonen
Head of Unit Climate Research

Contact

Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute

 

 

The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) is the national research and information centre for meteorology, climate, air quality, and seismology. It is an agency of the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment with its headquarters in De Bilt. KNMI has a total staff of around 400. Its principle task is to gather information about the atmosphere and the subsurface with the aim of providing advice on dangers and reaching risk reduction.  As such, its four research and development (R&D) departments are Weather and Climate Modeling, Observations and Data Technology, Satellite Observations as well as Seismology and Acoustics. These are complemented by the departments of Weather and Climate Services, Observation Operations, Information and Process Management as well as Product and Management Support.

KNMI’s climate activities focus on compiling climate scenarios and conducting research on the upper atmosphere, lower atmosphere (air quality, NO2), climate change (CO2), weather models, the ozone hole and ice sheets and sea level.

KNMI also runs the Climate Explorer, a freely available tool to analyse climate data at a range of different temporal and spatial scales.

Collaborative Programmes

KNMI is active in the following ECRA Collaborative Programmes:
1.    Arctic Climate Stability and Change
2.    High impact events and climate change
3.    Changes in the hydrological cycle
4.    Sea level change and coastal impacts

Projects

To be updated soon

Infrastructure

Access to computing resources (cutting edge High Performance Computing Facility (supercomputer), general severs and data archive)
Cesar Observatory
Paramaribo station, a joint initiative with the Meteorological Service of Surinam (MDS)
Climate Explorer (climexp.knmi.nl)

Contacts

Richard Bintanja (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Dewi Le Bars (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Bart van den Hurk (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Italian National Agency for New Technologies,  Energy and Sustainable Economic Development

 

 

The Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA) consists of nine research centres and five laboratories across Italy with its headquarters in Rome. Its research and innovation activities are focused on seven sectors, mainly Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Sources, Nuclear Energy, Climate and the Environment, Safety and Health, New Technologies, and Electrical System Research. ENEA's activities focus on basic, mission-oriented, and industrial research as well as experimental facilities, specialized laboratories, and advanced equipment. It has total staff of around 2,700 (2017).

ENEA’s activities within the Climate and Environment sector focus on Environmental Characterization, Prevention and Recovery; Environmental Technologies; Energy and Environmental Modeling; Marine Environment and Sustainable Development; and Expeditions in Antarctica and Research in Polar Areas.

Climate research within ENEA mostly takes place within the Department for Sustainability (SSPT), namely at the ‘Climate Modelling and Impacts’ Lab and at the Observations and Analyses of Earth and Climate Lab at the Casaccia Research Centre, Rome, with staff of about 40 people. Its activities are structured around Regional and Global Earth System Modeling, Climate Analyses and Processes, Global Climate and Predictability, Climate Services, Oceanography, Ocean Modeling (SSPT-MET-CLIM) and Climate variability from ice core records, Climate Observations (SSPT-PROTER-OAC). As such, Unit’s activities focus on paleoclimatic data and long-term datasets as well as understanding and predicting climate variability and change at the regional and global scale, with a geographic focus on the Mediterranean.

Collaborative Programmes

ENEA is active in the following ECRA Collaborative Programmes:
1.    Arctic Climate Stability and Change
2.    High impact events and climate change
3.    Sea level and climate change
4.    Changes in the hydrological cycle

Projects

A list of the most important national and international project that ENEA's climate research department is involved can be found at this link.

Infrastructure

Computers: giotto, leonardo, cimabue
Storage facilities
Station for climate observations “Roberto Sarao”, Lampedusa Island

Contacts

ENEA CR Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, I-00123 Roma (RM), ITALY
Dr Gianmaria Sannino, Head of Lab, SSPT-MET-CLIM
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Dr Daniela Meloni, Head of Lab, SSPT-PROTER-OAC
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ENEA ‘EU and International Organizations Unit’, Rue de Namur 72, 1000 Bruxelles, BE
Valerio Abbadessa (policy officer)
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Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres

The Helmholtz Association comprises 18 research centres participating in six research fields: Energy; Earth and Environment; Health; Aeronautics, Space and Transport; Key Technologies; and Matter. The goal of the Helmholtz Association is to identify and explore the major challenges facing society, science and industry through top-level research. Helmholtz’s annual budget is over €4 billion. The total staff is over 38,000 (2017).

The research field Earth and Environment includes eight Helmholtz Centres focusing on understanding the Earth system and linking the results to society. It conducts research within five programmes which are each further divided into more specific topics (funding period 2014-2018): Geosystem; Marine, Coastal and Polar Systems; Oceans; Atmosphere and Climate; and Terrestrial Environment.

Climate and climate change-related initiatives take place within the research field Earth and Environment. Key initiatives are the Climate Service Center Germany 2.0 and four Regional Climate Offices. Furthermore, nine Helmholtz centres come together in the Regional Climate Change Initiative REKLIM, which has the purpose of improving regional and global climate models. The measuring infrastructure Terrestrial Environmental Observatories (TERENO) with several terrestrial observatories in Germany is another initiative.

Collaborative Programmes

The Helmholtz Association is active in the following ECRA Collaborative Programmes:
1.    Arctic Climate Stability and Change
2.    High impact events and climate change
3.    Sea level change and coastal impacts
4.    Changes in the hydrological cycle

Projects

For a complete list of national and international projects that Helmholtz's Earth and Environment research centres are/were involved in, see this link.

Infrastructure

Research Vessels:
POLARSTERN, HEINCKE, POSEIDON, ALKOR

Monitoring stations:   
Polar station Neumayer Station III
Modular Earth Science Infrastructure (MESI)

Contacts (Earth and Environment)

Prof. Dr. Reinhard Hüttl
Research Field Coordinator Earth and Environment
Chairman of the Board and Scientific Executive Director
Helmholtz Centre Potsdam
GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences
+49 331 288-1010
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http://www.gfz-potsdam.de/

Dr. Cathrin Brüchmann
Research Field Earth and Environment
Helmholtz Association
Phone: +49 30 206329-45
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LogoThe standard Lorem Ipsum passage, used since the 1500s

"Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum."

Set image width to 280

1914 translation by H. Rackham

"But I must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account of the system, and expound the actual teachings of the great explorer of the truth, the master-builder of human happiness. No one rejects, dislikes, or avoids pleasure itself, because it is pleasure, but because those who do not know how to pursue pleasure rationally encounter consequences that are extremely painful. Nor again is there anyone who loves or pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself, because it is pain, but because occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure. To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure?"

 

LogoThe standard Lorem Ipsum passage, used since the 1500s

"Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum."

Set image width to 280

1914 translation by H. Rackham

"But I must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account of the system, and expound the actual teachings of the great explorer of the truth, the master-builder of human happiness. No one rejects, dislikes, or avoids pleasure itself, because it is pleasure, but because those who do not know how to pursue pleasure rationally encounter consequences that are extremely painful. Nor again is there anyone who loves or pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself, because it is pain, but because occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure. To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure?"

 

LogoThe standard Lorem Ipsum passage, used since the 1500s

"Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum."

Set image width to 280

1914 translation by H. Rackham

"But I must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account of the system, and expound the actual teachings of the great explorer of the truth, the master-builder of human happiness. No one rejects, dislikes, or avoids pleasure itself, because it is pleasure, but because those who do not know how to pursue pleasure rationally encounter consequences that are extremely painful. Nor again is there anyone who loves or pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself, because it is pain, but because occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure. To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure?"

 

LogoThe standard Lorem Ipsum passage, used since the 1500s

"Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum."

Set image width to 280

1914 translation by H. Rackham

"But I must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account of the system, and expound the actual teachings of the great explorer of the truth, the master-builder of human happiness. No one rejects, dislikes, or avoids pleasure itself, because it is pleasure, but because those who do not know how to pursue pleasure rationally encounter consequences that are extremely painful. Nor again is there anyone who loves or pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself, because it is pain, but because occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure. To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure?"

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